Paranormal subject – Dagulfs Ghost http://dagulfsghost.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:48:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://dagulfsghost.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-2-150x150.png Paranormal subject – Dagulfs Ghost http://dagulfsghost.com/ 32 32 HWPL World Peace Summit: A New Standard for Lasting Peace https://dagulfsghost.com/hwpl-world-peace-summit-a-new-standard-for-lasting-peace/ https://dagulfsghost.com/hwpl-world-peace-summit-a-new-standard-for-lasting-peace/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:21:28 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/hwpl-world-peace-summit-a-new-standard-for-lasting-peace/ (MENAFN- Caribbean News Global) UNITED STATES / SOUTH KOREA – September 24, 2021 – Heavenly Culture World Peace Restoration of Light (HWPL) hosted a virtual conference titled “A New Standard for Lasting Peace”. During the conference, participants discussed how HWPL has contributed to peace in the Caribbean region and collected best practices for future initiatives. […]]]>

(MENAFN- Caribbean News Global) UNITED STATES / SOUTH KOREA – September 24, 2021 – Heavenly Culture World Peace Restoration of Light (HWPL) hosted a virtual conference titled “A New Standard for Lasting Peace”.

During the conference, participants discussed how HWPL has contributed to peace in the Caribbean region and collected best practices for future initiatives. The virtual forum also marked the 7th annual commemoration of HWPL’s World Alliance of Religions for Peace (WARP) summit held in Seoul, South Korea.

Since 2014, this Summit has hosted political and religious leaders, leaders of women’s and youth groups, civil society and the press from around the world. Notable government and civil society leaders attending this year’s event included:

  • Kevin Bernard, Minister of Youth – Belize
  • Octavia Alfred, Minister of Education – Dominica
  • Dr Sa Sa, Union Minister, spokesperson for the Government of National Unity, former Special Envoy to the UN – Myanmar
  • Basdeo Panday, former Prime Minister – Trinidad and Tobago
  • Samuel Hinds, Former President and Current Ambassador to the United States – Guyana
  • Donald Ramotar, former Prime Minister – Guyana
  • Rod Remendambya, Chargé d’Affaires IA and Head of Embassy – Gabon
  • Maximo Anico Guzmán, Vice-President of ODEPRI – Dominican Republic
  • Centro de Ayuda para la Restauración Familiar – Dominican Republic
  • Rommel Santos Diaz – Dominican Republic
  • Christine Yassingou, Cultural Attaché, Embassy of the Central African Republic – Central African Republic
  • Marinus Bee, Speaker of the National Assembly of Suriname – Suriname
  • Steven Ishwardat, Advisor to the National Assembly of Suriname – Suriname
  • Veronica Dorsette-Hector, Acting Minister of Education, Youth and Sports – Montserrat.
  • Forum sessions covered a wide range of topics, including practical ways to amplify the voices of youth and women around peace, how interfaith dialogue sessions around peace have developed around the world through HWPL’s Alliance of Religions program efforts and the economic cost of violence. Together, the leaders of each session were able to discuss ways to implement the group’s peacebuilding principles set out in the Declaration of Peace and Cessation of War (DPCW).

    The DPCW is a legal framework for the dissemination of a culture of peace at local, national and international levels. The DPCW, which serves as a solution for world peace and conflict resolution, has already been promulgated as a national declaration in several countries around the world, including Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles and Eswatini, and international organizations such as the Parliament of Central America. The aim is to present the law as a regional resolution across the Caribbean Community.

    One of the speakers at the event, Donald Ramotar, former Prime Minister of Guyana said: “The system we live on, the war machine, is generally oriented towards maximizing profits. It does not try to solve the problem of war, does not try to solve the problem of poverty, does not try to solve the problems of inequality, does not try to solve many of these problems that have created other problems like migration.

    We need a new approach, a new systemic approach. But we need more cooperation in the world.

    An HWPL volunteer went on to say, “Heads of state must share our urgency in this regard. They must join and sign the DPCW for this progress work. It is the heads of state that must be moved like us for this work of peace. Each of us has a responsibility to our countries and to the world to find solutions for peace, like those contained in the 10 articles of the DPCW, so that we can reduce violence, benefit from peaceful efforts and take a step forward. more towards a world that each of us can be proud to pass on as a lasting legacy to future generations.

    The host organization, HWPL, is a non-governmental organization affiliated with the United Nations Economic and Social Council. The organization advocates for an end to wars and conflicts around the world. HWPL leads its peace initiatives in the Washington DC region and the Caribbean by working with its affiliate partners,

    the International Women’s Group for Peace (IWPG) and the International Youth Group for Peace (IPYG). In addition, regional leaders participate in the HWPL Peace Advisory Council and as HWPL advertising ambassadors.

    MENAFN06102021000232011072ID1102929838

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    Jinggoy Estrada seeks to meet challenges of a new normal in 2022 Senate – Manila Bulletin https://dagulfsghost.com/jinggoy-estrada-seeks-to-meet-challenges-of-a-new-normal-in-2022-senate-manila-bulletin/ https://dagulfsghost.com/jinggoy-estrada-seeks-to-meet-challenges-of-a-new-normal-in-2022-senate-manila-bulletin/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 04:38:41 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/jinggoy-estrada-seeks-to-meet-challenges-of-a-new-normal-in-2022-senate-manila-bulletin/ FFormer actor and politician Jinggoy Estrada (center) files his certificate of candidacy for the Senate on October 3. Also pictured are (left) the former vice mayor of San Juan and his daughter, Janella Estrada, and Jinggoy’s wife, Precy Ejercito. Actor-politician Jinggoy Estrada is a public servant like no other. Even as a young boy, the […]]]>
    FFormer actor and politician Jinggoy Estrada (center) files his certificate of candidacy for the Senate on October 3. Also pictured are (left) the former vice mayor of San Juan and his daughter, Janella Estrada, and Jinggoy’s wife, Precy Ejercito.

    Actor-politician Jinggoy Estrada is a public servant like no other.

    Even as a young boy, the former senator always knew that public service was his calling. Being the eldest son of Joseph Estrada, a popular film actor who had a long political career that included distinguished terms as mayor, senator and president of the Philippines, Jinggoy knew he was destined to follow in his father’s footsteps. .

    Although he also tried to play himself, Jinggoy started to throw his hat in the political arena at an early age. At just 25 years old, Jinggoy was already vice-mayor of his hometown of San Juan City, where his father was the oldest and best-known mayor. Soon after, Jinggoy became the youngest local chief executive in the country, just before turning 30.

    For three consecutive terms, the man nicknamed “Anak ng Masa” transformed San Juan into one of the most progressive and peaceful municipalities in the Philippines. Having led projects and programs for the economic, social, political and cultural affairs of the city, it is no surprise that he won the trust and admiration of his fellow CEOs when he was elected president. National League of Municipalities of the Philippines. from 1998 to 2001.

    This enabled Mayor Jinggoy to showcase his impressive skills in public administration at the national level. Recognizing the potential of local government units as reliable partners in nation building, Mayor Jinggoy was at the forefront of many programs that empower local government units (LGUs) and help secure and produce better and more modern service facilities in at least 1,525 municipalities.

    At the end of his third term and with San Juan now a highly urbanized metropolis, Mayor Jinggoy was already looking forward to bigger things to come. The year 2004 marked a new beginning for young Estrada as he entered the first of his two six-year terms as Senator of the Republic. He immediately got to work and, in no time, gained a reputation as one of the hardest-working and prolific lawmakers in the country.

    During his time in the Senate, Senator Jinggoy served as President pro tempore of the Senate and chaired the Senate Committee on Labor, Employment and Human Resources and the Congressional Oversight Committee on Labor and Labor. ’employment as well as a member of many other committees, including the Appointments Committee.

    As a legislator, Senator Jinggoy introduced hundreds of bills during his two terms. More than 600 of these bills were tabled in the 16e congress from 2013 to 2016, many of which have been attributed to him as principal author. Most of its priority bills were aimed at improving and strengthening policies affecting our workforce and foreign workers abroad, empowering our local government units, protecting and preserving our freedom of expression and meeting and promote the well-being of young people.

    One of the landmark laws of which he himself is the primary author is Republic Law 10361 or simply known as Kasambahay Law, or the Law Promoting the Interests and Welfare of Domestic Workers in the Philippines because it establishes prescribed standards, privileges and rights that benefit them.

    Senator Jinggoy also sponsored and successfully led the adoption of the PESO or RA 10691 law, the SPES or RA 10917 law, the strengthening of the NLRC or RA 10741, the lifting of the ban on night work for women or RA 10151, among others. He also actively participated in the development of other important measures such as the AML law, the amendments to the National Tax Code on E-VAT and excise tax, the national budget, the synchronized elections of Barangay and Saskatchewan, ratifying the International Labor Organization’s Forced Labor Convention.

    Even with all of these accomplishments and not counting his equally remarkable accolades as an actor, Senator Jinggoy believes his work as a public servant is far from over. On September 29, 2021, he officially announced he was running for a Senate again in next year’s national elections.

    “Mga kababayan, mga kasama, mga ka-masa, ako po si Jinggoy, buong puso kong inihahayag ang intensyong makibahagi sa malinis na halalan upand maging senador muli,” Jinggoy said in a personal address posted on Facebook Live.

    By seeking a new mandate and adopting the new slogan “Aaksyon para sa masa”, Senator Jinggoy hopes “to help solve the fundamental problems and challenges facing the country within the framework of the new normal”. He hopes to achieve this by developing new legislation focused on food security, job creation, health system strengthening and ensuring equitable access, youth empowerment, modernized agricultural sector, digital economy strong and robust, sustainable environmental protection and adaptable and accessible quality education.

    Senator Jinggoy also hopes to be the author or co-author of measures focusing on strengthening local governments for full decentralization and more sustainable developments in areas outside the NCR.


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    Turkey sees price behavior returning to normal (CBRT governor) https://dagulfsghost.com/turkey-sees-price-behavior-returning-to-normal-cbrt-governor/ https://dagulfsghost.com/turkey-sees-price-behavior-returning-to-normal-cbrt-governor/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 13:18:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/turkey-sees-price-behavior-returning-to-normal-cbrt-governor/ The governor of Turkey’s central bank said on Tuesday that he expects price behavior to return to normal as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic abate, adding that the bank will continue to take the measures policies needed to support standardization. Speaking at the Future of Finance Summit, hosted by Turkuvaz, the parent company of […]]]>

    The governor of Turkey’s central bank said on Tuesday that he expects price behavior to return to normal as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic abate, adding that the bank will continue to take the measures policies needed to support standardization.

    Speaking at the Future of Finance Summit, hosted by Turkuvaz, the parent company of Daily Sabah and its broadcaster A Para, Şahap Kavcıoğlu said world food prices have shown sharp increases and the continuing drought and production conditions had a negative impact on prices.

    Turkey is among the countries where food prices have risen the most, which Kavcıoğlu says would decline as the composition of demand normalizes, supply restrictions eased and base effects decoupled.

    “These elements will also have a downward effect on inflation in our country in the coming period,” added the governor.

    The annual increase in consumer prices in Turkey accelerated to 19.25% in August, above the key rate of the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey (CBRT) and at its highest level in addition to two years.

    Food inflation climbed nearly 30% in August from a year ago and more than 3% from the previous month.

    In contrast, the producer price index rose 2.77% month-on-month for an annual increase of 45.52%.

    Kavcıoğlu said the gap between consumer and producer inflation was not specific to Turkey alone, noting that it had recently increased significantly above the long-term average in many developed countries. and in development.

    The governor has attributed to some extent the recent surge in the prices of some commodities to the pandemic as well as rising commodity prices and disruptions in supply chains. Yet, he said, “we are seeing higher price increases, especially in sectors that have been negatively affected by the pandemic and where demand has been strong.”

    “However, we believe that these emerging pricing behaviors will converge again to their pre-pandemic state over the coming period as economic and social normalization accelerates,” he noted.

    Turkey this week launched an investigation into the country’s five largest supermarket chains after it was blamed for soaring prices in the country.

    Trade Minister Mehmet Muş ordered officials to inspect the prices of a wide range of products, from eggs, milk and vegetables to cleaning products at the five grocery chains, a ministry statement said on Saturday. .

    President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan earlier vowed that Turkey would bring the price hike under control as quickly as possible and vowed that the government would prevent “unreasonable” price hikes.

    Kavcıoğlu’s remarks came after the central bank unexpectedly cut its key rate by 100 basis points to 18% last week.

    The key one-week rate was expected to remain largely stable at 19%, where it had been since March, given rising inflation. It was Turkey’s first monetary easing since May 2020 and the end of a tightening cycle that began 12 months ago.

    The day before, Kavcıoğlu told online newspaper T24 that it was difficult for monetary policy to have an effect on food price inflation, and cited the needs of the real sector when asked about the rate cut from last week.

    The governor also said that the main reason for the depreciation of the Turkish lira in September was statements by the US Federal Reserve (Fed), adding that there was no reason for the currency to continue to fall rapidly.

    The pound fell to an all-time high of 8.8995 per dollar on Friday, a day after the bank announced the rate cut.

    Kavcioğlu reiterated that there was no reason for the pound to depreciate rapidly against the dollar, citing a reduction in the current account deficit and an increase in pound deposits.

    Also addressing the summit on Tuesday, Deputy Treasury and Finance Minister Akir Ercan Gül said there were two ways to cut interest rates.

    “You will limit the budget deficit, minimize the current account deficit. We can reduce the interest by filling these two gaps, ”said Gül.

    He also said that loan volumes cannot be increased at random without establishing a healthy lending mechanism.

    “We have to be selective. This must be done in particular by properly financing trade, industry and, if necessary, by increasing the cost of consumer credit a little more.


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    Hang on to Leftovers: The Printing Industry Struggles to Survive in the ‘New Normal’ https://dagulfsghost.com/hang-on-to-leftovers-the-printing-industry-struggles-to-survive-in-the-new-normal/ https://dagulfsghost.com/hang-on-to-leftovers-the-printing-industry-struggles-to-survive-in-the-new-normal/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 06:33:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/hang-on-to-leftovers-the-printing-industry-struggles-to-survive-in-the-new-normal/ MANILA, Philippines – Without a doubt, the printing press has played a role in the life of a student, employee or anyone who has to submit documents and these views are not foreign to them. But like any business, it has also been hit hard by the pandemic. This is a rather special case for […]]]>

    MANILA, Philippines – Without a doubt, the printing press has played a role in the life of a student, employee or anyone who has to submit documents and these views are not foreign to them.

    But like any business, it has also been hit hard by the pandemic.

    This is a rather special case for this industry. Printing is and always will be bound on paper, which in a sense puts it at risk of obsolescence in the digital age.

    With virtually every industry gone virtual and paperless, the printing industry – a relic of the pre-pandemic era – is forced to rethink its ways while waiting for the day its machines will work overtime again to meet the deadlines of its customers.

    Go online

    For most of the Metro Manila-based printing companies, online services have been the preferred method. Key processes such as transmitting payments and communicating with customers are now carried out online or through mobile applications.

    Ricky Regis, an employee of the Kooyah Copy Center along Asturias Street in Manila, said the new method has kept the business going.

    “The operations continue because I have clients that I am friends with on social networks. So with that, transactions are done online, ”he said in an interview with Talamitam.

    “It’s not completely successful, but it’s okay anyway. The case continues. “

    Compared to the old standard, Regis finds this new setup easier because it causes less stress.

    “It’s less stressful now. No one waits or comes rushing in, we don’t have that anymore. These days you can take your time because orders are only picked up, ”Regis said.

    Like Regis, Sophie Ancheta and Rex Rodriguez are convinced that the online sphere has kept their printing business afloat.

    “Good. Nice. It’s good because that (online presence) has been a big help for us. The online services have been a big help for us and we agree for the moment” , said Ancheta.

    “Since then, we have relied on online services. That’s what really kept us afloat.

    Adjustments

    However, some printing companies have chosen to continue to operate only in physical stores.

    Located along the university belt is Jonathan Labrador’s printing press. Unlike other counterparts who already have an online presence, survival has been difficult for his business.

    “Ngayon talaga medyo hirap yung business namin ngayon, so ginagawa namin para maka-survive talaga, kahit ano na lang na maging client namin na impression, yun, pinapatos na namin [Our business is struggling right now. So what we do is that we don’t become too picky with our clients anymore when it comes to printing],” he said.

    Other print shop owners keep their businesses alive for love.

    Mario Canales, owner of a store in Binan, Laguna, said his business had remained “fairly normal” even though it had lost its regular customers like students, who now take courses online.

    But unlike some of his peers, Canales gives himself the luxury of not depending on his business to support his family.

    “Compared to the last time before the pandemic, my quote to date has remained the same. This is because our business is no longer for profit, it is more of a past time. We don’t need to send anyone to school anymore because our children have already finished their studies, ”he said in an interview.

    Canales has gotten to a point where their rates have been inconsistent. According to him, the rates have been lower, if not free, rather than his standard P5 per page rate.

    But some printing companies are not so lucky and have completely shut down.

    Several traders and local residents were only able to report a few areas where there are still operating printing shops, such as Morayta in Sampaloc and the town of Carmona proper in Cavite, south of Metro Manila.

    New environment, new struggles

    Naturally, a new environment brings about a new series of struggles.

    For these printing companies, facing financial constraints is a common denominator.

    “Our main struggle now is to reach the quota. We pay so much rent that we really have to meet that quota, ”Rodriguez said.

    “There are a lot of changes especially in terms of income, then there are several layoffs because of this income problem,” he added.

    Labrador echoed a similar sentiment.

    “We’re struggling to pay the rent right now. Back then, you know, we could hit the quota. But now, earning P500 a day is already difficult. Of course, there are essential expenses, so we only earn P500, ”Labrador said.

    “At the time, we were making about $ 2,500. Now we are struggling to earn that much.

    But the changes caused by the pandemic were not limited to lower profits.

    An unusual silence gripped print shops as pandemic restrictions forced schools to adopt a virtual learning setup.

    “At the time, we would just ask the students to approach us, and then we would ask them to go to our store upstairs. We were also able to get customers because we stepped up our service, ”Labrador said.

    “Of course we got used to it (silence). What was considered abnormal at the time is starting to become normal, ”he added.

    Labrador, Ancheta, Regis and Rodriguez were initially shocked at the “new normal” they hoped wouldn’t stay for long. But for now, they have no choice but to find ways to deal with their losses.

    “At first it was boring. But now I’m getting used to it because I’m already busy with work, ”said Régis.

    But while they have their struggles, all hope is not lost for these people.

    Moving forward

    Realizing that the pandemic is not likely to end anytime soon, some print shop owners have started to expand their businesses.

    Ancheta and Rodriguez are now selling items such as perfume and face shields to increase their income.

    Ancheta said his new business got him back on track financially after a difficult start due to the pandemic.

    “In fact, we sunk badly. You have no choice but to pay for your store. Even if there is no income, you still have to pay, so our business really went down. But when we got to think about new businesses, that’s when we started to recover, ”she said.

    Rodriguez sees his additional business as a way to return to pre-pandemic income levels.

    “Since the start of the pandemic, so many things have been added to our store, like face shields and face masks. We also continue to think about other ways to increase our income so that we can earn money like before, ”he said.

    Labrador began to accept orders such as ID cards and PVC cards to survive.

    “Kahit yung dati na di naman namin pini-print eh pini-print na namin, katulad ng mga sa ID, PVC [polyvinyl chloride] [cards]. Kasi dati hindi namin kaya gugulin yung oras noon eh, my priority namin yung impression ng mga estyudante. Eh ngayon eh wala kaming client, yun yung mga tinatanggap namin [Even the ones that we didn’t do, we do now already. Examples would be IDs, PVC cards. Before we couldn’t afford to do that since they take so much time and we prioritized students’ requests. But now, we do not have a lot of customers, so we accept that now]” he said

    However, some printing business owners have stuck with their printing business, with little or no alternatives.

    While profit is no longer Canales’ main consideration in keeping his store, he admitted he was considering new business ventures.

    “My plan at the moment is to continue. But then, like you said, a lot of people started having their own printers. If that’s the case, then maybe I could start looking at different companies, ”Canales said.

    While there are no signs that things are going to get better anytime soon – the Philippines has recorded more than 20,000 new cases daily in the past few days – printing business owners are not giving up hope.

    “Huwag mawalan ng-asa pag dating his business. Ang tumal, hindi inaayawan, tinitiis [Don’t lose hope when it comes to business. You endure a sales drought, rather than give up on it]Labrador said. – Talamitam

    —-

    This article is a production of Talamitam, a network of schools created in 2017 by the journalism companies of the University of Santo Tomas, the State University of Bulacan, the Colegio de San Juan de Letran, the Lyceum of l University of the Philippines, Polytechnic University of the Philippines and University of the East. Talamitam aims to empower ordinary citizens through community journalism, focusing on topics not commonly reported by mainstream media and alternative angles of current issues.

    To achieve its goal of raising public awareness of community issues, Talamitam publishes articles in the media. News agencies can use or republish the stories for free provided they give credit to Talamitam and the authors.

    Talamitam is a Tagalog-Kapampangan word for conversation.


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    Here’s when experts say vaccinated people can ‘go back to normal’ https://dagulfsghost.com/heres-when-experts-say-vaccinated-people-can-go-back-to-normal/ https://dagulfsghost.com/heres-when-experts-say-vaccinated-people-can-go-back-to-normal/#respond Mon, 27 Sep 2021 03:16:49 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/?p=365 It’s been over a year since my office shut down. Over a year since I went to a bar, a fitness class, a movie theater, a concert, a Knicks game, or to the many other public events that were once centerpieces of my social life. But there’s finally, finally a finish line in sight. There […]]]>

    It’s been over a year since my office shut down. Over a year since I went to a bar, a fitness class, a movie theater, a concert, a Knicks game, or to the many other public events that were once centerpieces of my social life.

    But there’s finally, finally a finish line in sight. There are three safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines authorized and available in the US — and at least 90 percent of all adults will be eligible to receive one by April 19th. If our current vaccination pace continues, 75 percent of adults will have at least one dose by early summer. Reader, I am dying to get back to my favorite activities, and I can tell that people around me are, too.

    But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, vaccinated people aren’t out of the woods yet. The agency’s current guidelines still severely limit some activities that are a big part of many people’s “normal” and some people’s livelihoods: theaters, concerts, bars, sporting events, and the like.

    Now, I know concerts aren’t more important than public health, and I’m happy to follow expert advice for as long as needed to stop the spread of COVID-19. But that hasn’t stopped me from wondering “when?” When can our pre-pandemic lives resume, without distancing, capacity limits, quarantines, and other restrictions? When can I go clubbing again?

    Lately, there’s been a lot of great writing about what vaccinated people should and shouldn’t do right now. But that didn’t help me get a clear picture of what the future might hold. So I spoke to seven experts, who have all been involved in studying or treating COVID-19, about a slightly different question. I asked them: What signs are we waiting for? When will we know that we can get back to “normal”?

    Those are difficult questions to answer because there are a lot of uncertain variables, and the situation is changing rapidly. The US is averaging over 3 million doses per day, and some states are already dropping their pandemic restrictions — but COVID-19 cases are still on the rise, and officials are worried about an upcoming surge. To understand what our “normality” goalposts are, it’s important to first understand what those unknowns are and why the CDC is asking people to keep being patient after they get their shot.

    Let’s start with the basics: if I’m fully vaccinated, why should I still avoid crowds?

    When you’re fully vaccinated, you want to avoid coming into close contact with unvaccinated people. For one, no vaccine is 100 percent effective. Some experts I spoke to believe they’re effective enough that vaccinated people can justifiably stop worrying about their own risk, while others continued to urge caution. But everyone agreed that while we have data on the efficacy of the vaccines in preventing you from getting severe COVID yourself, we have less information about how well they prevent you from potentially passing it to unvaccinated people. Every expert I spoke to cited this as a reason vaccinated people still needed to be cautious while COVID is widespread in their area. It’s also mentioned in the CDC’s guidance.

    I pressed on this, though, because it’s not the case that we have no information on this topic. Preliminary studies from Israel have indicated that Pfizer’s vaccine greatly reduces transmission, and the CDC recently found even more evidence that Pfizer’s and Moderna’s shots are highly effective at preventing infection in vaccinated frontline workers. So I asked the experts how much more information they’d need before they were comfortable with vaccinated people returning to public crowds.

    I got a wide variety of responses here. Brian Cruz, regional medical director of PhysicianOne Urgent Care, says he’s waiting for more peer-reviewed studies. The Pfizer data from Israel, for example, isn’t peer reviewed, and the researchers have stated that further study is needed. And while the CDC’s findings indicate that the US vaccines are likely effective in preventing COVID infection, Cruz notes, they don’t settle the question of whether a vaccinated person can be an asymptomatic carrier. He doesn’t think it’ll take too long for all of that to be cleared up. “There’s a strong push to get that information out,” he tells me. “I think we’re getting to that point.”

    Others don’t feel that they’ll be satisfied with transmission research at any point in the near future. Before a majority of people are vaccinated, “regardless of the science that might come up … I don’t think it’s responsible to gather in medium or large-sized groups,” says epidemiologist Matthew Weissenbach, senior director of clinical affairs at Wolters Kluwer.

    Epidemiologist Brian Castrucci, who is president of the de Beaumont Foundation, stressed that uncertainty around transmission is less of a concern when a high proportion of people are protected. “This is a novel virus and a novel vaccine. We’re going to be learning for a while as to how it interacts and how it works,” he says. What we do know, he adds, is that “the more people who are vaccinated, the less the virus has a path forward.”

    With those answers in mind, I began asking about the future.

    When can I go see Hamilton in the room where it happens — instead of on TV?

    You can’t control who else attends large public events (theater, clubbing, concerts, religious services, basketball games, and the like), and a vaccinated person will run the risk of coming into close contact with unvaccinated people.

    Some of these events can happen in a low-risk manner with modifications — small religious gatherings outdoors with six feet between participants, for example. But I wanted to know what it will take to get the full nine yards back: indoor crowds, full capacity, screaming and cheering, the works.

    The big thing to look out for with local events is the pace of vaccination in your community, since most venues like bars, churches, and, yes, theaters, largely draw local patrons. (There are exceptions, of course — more on those later.) The CDC is reporting vaccination rates, case counts, hospital utilization, deaths, and other metrics by county.

    Experts say they’ll be watching for a few things. One is case counts. A positive test rate of 0.5 percent or lower would be a good sign, according to Mireya Wessolossky, an infectious disease specialist at UMass Memorial Medical Center and associate professor at UMass Medical School. Another is hospitalizations. “There need to be no people in the hospital, or once in a while,” Wessolossky says. Another is the overall direction of cases and hospitalizations — “What we need to see is that all the trends continue in the right direction as we start to get back to normality,” said Andrew Catchpole, virologist and chief scientific officer at hVivo.

    And a fourth is the proportion of people in your community who are vaccinated. Most of the experts I spoke to said they’ll be most comfortable with large, public events when the area in question has a vaccinated proportion sufficient for herd immunity — the point at which enough people are immune to a disease that a community as a whole is protected, including those who don’t have immunity themselves.

    When can I have my birthday party?

    Here’s the good news: your birthday party, book club meeting, and other personal gatherings should be fine now, provided that everyone invited is fully vaccinated. So if you’ve been holding out on throwing an indoor birthday party, you should be waiting until two weeks after everyone on your invite list has had their shots.

    Weddings are the one area where experts seem to diverge. Weissenbach thinks they should wait for herd immunity (or should be held outdoors, with distancing precautions) since there are likely to be outside staff involved with ambiguous vaccination status. “You probably have food vendors, you probably have a DJ,” he says. “I’m not super comfortable with it.”

    Others were tentatively okay with indoor weddings of fully vaccinated guests sooner. But everyone did agree that for weddings (or parties or other sorts of indoor, unmasked, and close gatherings) with unvaccinated guests, herd immunity is the goal.


    Okay, cool. So how many people need to be vaccinated for herd immunity against COVID-19?

    Unfortunately, we won’t know that for a while. The threshold for herd immunity varies between diseases, and COVID-19 is a new virus. The best we can do for now is make educated guesses based on our knowledge of other viruses.

    It’s possible that COVID’s number is very high — a population needs a 95 percent vaccination rate to achieve herd immunity against measles. However, COVID is unlikely to be as contagious as measles, and many of the experts I spoke to were comfortable with a rough estimate of 70 to 80 percent. That’s also the range Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, projected in mid-December. “I would feel good about 70 to 80 percent,” says Castrucci.

    Some were more optimistic: Michelle Prickett, an associate professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, says she’d be okay lifting some restrictions above the 50 percent mark. And others are less so. Catchpole tells me, “To operate at maximum safety and minimum risk, we’d want to see as close to a 100 percent takeup of the vaccine as possible before pre-pandemic normality is brought back.”

    Plenty of factors could impact what those thresholds are, and how long it takes to reach them. But overall, this goalpost is clear: we want a large majority of people to be fully vaccinated.

    Got it. So can I plan to attend the Stanley Cup playoffs this year?

    This year’s Super Bowl was not a COVID superspreader event, according to health officials. Fifty-seven cases were linked to official Super Bowl festivities, and 25 people were exposed at the events — over 280,000 people participated. That said, this year’s Super Bowl was held in an open-air stadium at less than half capacity, and fans were required to wear masks and adhere to social-distancing measures. So I asked what it would take for the experts to go back to indoor games with full crowds.

    Castrucci says nationwide vaccine rates are more important here than local numbers — the 70 to 80 percent threshold is the goal. Even if they’re taking place in your area, big sporting events and gatherings at similar scale may bring in fans from all across the country. You may not know whether other attendees you’ll encounter are vaccinated, where they came from, or what vaccine rates are in their area. “Something like a Super Bowl, that’s something to be thoughtful about,” Castrucci says. “We’re only going to be as safe as the group that is vaccinated least.”

    Seventy to 80 percent seems high — are we actually going to hit these numbers?

    I got a chorus of emphatic yeses; the experts I asked believe that number is realistic. “A little bit of patience and we’re going to get to that point,” says Cruz.

    The segment of people who plan to get a vaccine is promising. A recent poll indicated that 69 percent of US adults had already gotten the vaccine or were willing to get one (and that proportion may be much higher in your region). And nearly everyone who gets the first dose of a two-shot vaccine has been getting their second one within the recommended window. Kids also make up 22 percent of the US population, and it’s looking like 12- to 15-year-olds could have access to shots before the next school year. Opening up that bracket will likely make up for some adult hesitancy.

    It’s also likely that more hesitant people will be pushed to get the shot if schools and other institutions make COVID vaccines mandatory. And there’s also a normalization factor at play. “Once someone initially resistant to getting a vaccine shot knows other people within their peer group who have had a vaccination, they’re more likely to change their mind,” says Catchpole.


    What about that Cancun vacation I’ve been putting off?

    International travel will take longer. Many countries around the world are not open to US tourists, and some that are have still highly discouraged leisure travel and are requiring arrivals to test and quarantine before they can enter. If you’re planning an international vacation, that’s going to be an even longer waiting game than getting tickets to any big event. Some experts caution that countries might open their borders prematurely but still recommend that fully vaccinated people keep six feet of distance from others during their trips and quarantine before and after.

    Wessolossky says travelers should be looking at the proportion of people who have been vaccinated at their destination, once it’s open (as well as other metrics like positive test rates and hospitalizations). That’s especially true because if you’re vacationing, you may want to visit restaurants, bars, or other indoor attractions where the virus and variants of the virus can spread easily.

    Shoot, now I’m thinking about variants. How do they factor into vacation planning?

    Even if the country you’re aiming to visit is open and vaccinated at high rates, Wessolossky says, it would be a bad idea to visit if there’s a new variant circulating there and you can’t find research on how it interacts with your vaccine.

    But like transmission, variants aren’t a topic we know nothing about. Some current research suggests that while our vaccines may be less effective against some concerning variants, they likely still provide some degree of protection. So I asked: what information are we waiting on regarding the variants we’re currently worried about, and given that future variants are a perpetual question mark, will we ever know enough?

    The answer to both questions appears to be infrastructure: tests for detecting variants aren’t yet approved for diagnostic use in the US, and only a small number of US labs can validate them, so variant-focused contact tracing is difficult. “If we had the science infrastructure to sequence variants … things would become clearer,” Castrucci says. “We haven’t made those investments.”

    Prickett says she’s waiting for the US to scale up that monitoring and testing capacity before she’ll feel comfortable with total normality. “The best way to get a hold of variants is to do early observation, and we need a bit more infrastructure here in the US and globally,” she says. The Biden administration has committed nearly $200 million to expanding that capacity.

    Weissenbach says variants just underscore the need for countries to reach herd immunity. “It’s like a wildfire in California,” he says. “They’re going to continue to crop up. We’re just trying to put a squash on it.”

    Bottom line: what are we waiting for?

    After getting such a wide variety of answers to so many of my questions, I am left hopeful but also frustrated. How should laypeople like me navigate our lives post-vaccine when even medical experts disagree?

    While it may seem tempting to draw the conclusion that this all comes down to a value judgment — you should weigh your risk tolerance against how much you value your wedding or vacation and make your own decision — that doesn’t sit right with me. Our risk is our business, sure, but we’re also asked to restrict our behavior to keep other people safe. And I’ll be brutally honest: I miss live entertainment, traveling, and even indoor dining enough that if I really believed that my post-vaccine decisions came down solely to my own risk-reward calculus, I’d probably drop all pre-vaccine restrictions as soon as I was two weeks out from that last shot. That’s a decision I think every expert in this article would agree is the wrong one because there’s an element of responsibility in the equation as well.

    Some folks will certainly disregard all public health guidelines and start globetrotting immediately after their second shot. Others may swear off concerts for the rest of their lives. But many people (myself included) feel an obligation not to contribute to spread but would also benefit from knowing there’s an end in sight — knowing that there’s a time coming when the risk of spread will be low enough that we can go back to our favorite pre-pandemic joys with science on our side.

    So here’s my takeaway, for what it’s worth. Experts across disciplines have conflicting advice. As vaccination rates rise, we’ll likely see some authorities relax their demands, while others continue to urge caution. Governors will allow things to open, and people on Twitter will urge you not to go. It’s going to be a confusing time, and different areas will move at different paces. But for the riskiest indoor activities, there’s a tentative finish line in sight: we’re waiting for a large majority of our communities to be fully vaccinated, and for cases and hospitalizations to decline. Here’s my mental finish line: with the caveat that variants and other circumstances could change the equation, and that precautions should be eased carefully rather than thrown to the winds, 70 to 80 percent is the rough threshold I’m watching for.

    To gut check this conclusion I turned to Ben Bates, a professor at Ohio University who studies health communication and messaging. He’s not surprised that I’d had trouble finding straight answers. He emphasizes that communicating public-health guidance is challenging, and he thinks some of the expert messaging around COVID has underweighted the value of social gatherings. “The way science and public health work is you want to accumulate as much evidence as possible and test it over and over,” Bates says. “By nature these are very cautious, conservative people. I don’t think we’ll hear for a good long time ‘It is now absolutely safe to go out.’”

    But Bates thinks the prospect of US communities hitting a high vaccination threshold, and seeing a subsequent decline in community transmission, is “quite realistic” and agrees that it’s a reasonable milestone to wait for that fairly balances risk aversion against the costs of restrictions and the high value of social gatherings. “Politicians, and business folks, and church leaders and so on will rightly say, ‘This is the kind of number you said would help protect us, and we’ve reached that number,” Bates says. “That’s when I think things will be pretty darn opened up.”

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    Odisha: Para-players demand government jobs and equality with normal players | Bhubaneswar News https://dagulfsghost.com/odisha-para-players-demand-government-jobs-and-equality-with-normal-players-bhubaneswar-news/ https://dagulfsghost.com/odisha-para-players-demand-government-jobs-and-equality-with-normal-players-bhubaneswar-news/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/odisha-para-players-demand-government-jobs-and-equality-with-normal-players-bhubaneswar-news/ BHUBANEWAR: After the extraordinary performance of the para-athletes at the Tokyo Paralympic Games and Odisha’s commuter Pramod Bhagat winning a gold medal, Odisha’s para-athletes sharpened their voice for equality with normal players. Odisha Para-player Forum – an association of para-athletes demanded the inclusion of specially disabled athletes in the direct recruiting program and offered them […]]]>
    BHUBANEWAR: After the extraordinary performance of the para-athletes at the Tokyo Paralympic Games and Odisha’s commuter Pramod Bhagat winning a gold medal, Odisha’s para-athletes sharpened their voice for equality with normal players.
    Odisha Para-player Forum – an association of para-athletes demanded the inclusion of specially disabled athletes in the direct recruiting program and offered them government jobs like any other normal athlete.
    “Equality is just a word of assurance for us. We have been asking for government jobs for several years, but our request has remained silent. Now, after the brilliant performance of our para-athletes and Pramod Bhagat who brought laurels to the state and the country, we ask the state government to take us seriously, ”said Rakhal Sethy, secretary of the Odisha Para Players Forum.
    Sethy, 37, a national level fencer who has represented India at the Asian Games, has appeared in 5 world cups, 2 world championships and won 36 national medals, is also a candidate for the job.
    In addition, among his students whom he trained, 14 won medals at the national level without any support from the government.
    Sources said that currently 33 para players are eligible for employment, six of whom have secured employment in their own efforts. Of the remaining 27, seven participated in the Asian Games and the rest won national medals. Para-players also alleged that there is no training, hostel and training facilities for para-athletes in the state.
    Sunil Pradhan, another para-athlete and commuter said: “In terms of financial assistance, para-athletes also receive less than normal players. Normal players who played at the Asian Games received Rs 7.5 lakh while para-athletes only received Rs 50,000. Why this disparity? In other states like Haryana and Gujarat, they offer equal opportunity and financial and infrastructural support to para-players and normal players. When the Odisha government claims to be the sports capital of India, is it possible without bringing the para-players?
    However, sources from the sports department said that para-athletes have taken advantage of employment opportunities under the 1% athlete reserve, whenever such a recruitment process is undertaken for various departments and organizations.
    Para-athletes are not eligible for jobs in the Odisha Police Department and positions in state PSUs.
    The chief secretary called a meeting in this regard on August 27 and asked relevant departments to look into the matter and prepare full guidelines.
    Given the physical standards criteria of Odisha Police, the Chief Secretary had asked to consider whether Para-athletes could be considered for Group C positions in various departments, instead of recruiting at the level of police officers.
    “A full draft resolution to be prepared by the GA department including all existing resolutions and appropriate modifications to include Group C positions for the recruitment of sportsmen and para-athletes in government and public sector companies ( PSU) ”, Sailendra Kumar Jena, Joint Secretariat, Sports and Youth Department.


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    Phivolcs lowers Bulusan volcano to “normal” alert level https://dagulfsghost.com/phivolcs-lowers-bulusan-volcano-to-normal-alert-level/ https://dagulfsghost.com/phivolcs-lowers-bulusan-volcano-to-normal-alert-level/#respond Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/phivolcs-lowers-bulusan-volcano-to-normal-alert-level/ Philstar.com August 18, 2021 | 10:07 MANILA, Philippines – Phivolcs has lowered the alert level on Bulusan volcano in Sorsogon to zero, indicating a return to normal. In a volcanoes bulletin Wednesday morning, state volcanologists said, “Bulusan volcano is back to normal following a general drop in monitoring parameters.” This included the decline in volcanic […]]]>

    Philstar.com

    August 18, 2021 | 10:07

    MANILA, Philippines – Phivolcs has lowered the alert level on Bulusan volcano in Sorsogon to zero, indicating a return to normal.

    In a volcanoes bulletin Wednesday morning, state volcanologists said, “Bulusan volcano is back to normal following a general drop in monitoring parameters.”

    This included the decline in volcanic seismic activity from July 1 to August 17, the Bulusan Building’s short-term inflation since July, and the sulfur dioxide emission flux from active vents remained below detection levels. since May 6.

    Regarding surface activity, Phivolcs said: “When present, the vapor plume emissions from the active vents on the Bulusan upper edifice have been very low to low, which corresponds to decreased hydrothermal activity. . “

    “This means that the observation parameters have returned to baseline levels and that no magmatic eruption is expected in the immediate future,” he added. But the agency warned that a further increase in any or all of the monitoring settings would again prompt them to raise the alert status.

    Phivolcs raised Alert Level 1 on Bulusan, a stratovolcano considered to be one of the most active in the country, on May 11 after the agency recorded 124 volcanic earthquakes in the past three days at that time. .

    While lowering the alert level on Bulusan, Phivolcs however reiterated its reminder that entering the permanent danger zone or PDZ of 4 km due to permanent risks of rockfall, avalanches and sudden eruptions of vapor or phreatic from active vents, which may occur without warning.

    “In addition, people living in active river valleys and canals are urged to remain vigilant against sediment-laden runoff and flooding during prolonged and heavy rains,” he added.

    Phivolcs assured that he will continue to monitor Bulusan closely and report any new development on the volcano.


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    Experts – NBC Bay Area https://dagulfsghost.com/experts-nbc-bay-area/ https://dagulfsghost.com/experts-nbc-bay-area/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/experts-nbc-bay-area/ California is in the midst of another drought, and experts say the strategy should be more than hoping for a sufficient supply of precipitation. The fact that a growing population inhabits the dry and arid conditions of the West has consequences, which even non-experts have recognized. Aggravated by the effects of climate change and the […]]]>

    California is in the midst of another drought, and experts say the strategy should be more than hoping for a sufficient supply of precipitation.

    The fact that a growing population inhabits the dry and arid conditions of the West has consequences, which even non-experts have recognized. Aggravated by the effects of climate change and the specter of more intense dry years ahead, government officials and residents of the West are exploring how to reframe water conservation efforts towards a more holistic approach.

    Environmentalists, water researchers and other experts spoke at a “Drought in the American West” webinar hosted by Circle of Blue on Wednesday, discussing the multifaceted impacts of drought and the role of human-induced climate change.

    Heather Cooley, research director at the Pacific Institute in Oakland, said false notions of water abundance in the West first surfaced with the early settlers. Greater economic prosperity and population growth ultimately resulted in an insatiable need for water, which affected the natural water supply and left some populations vulnerable.

    “The challenges we now face are the result of decisions of the past, but it is incumbent on all of us to take action now for a more sustainable, resilient and water-just future for the West,” Cooley said. .

    A resilient water supply system, according to Pacific Institute President Emeritus Peter Gleick, is both flexible and redundant, as well as well integrated with other agencies. This does not mean further depleting water supplies to meet demand, as was the case before.

    Potential solutions to avoid going beyond the ecosystem’s natural capacity for water supply, also known as freshwater pathways, include water recycling, precipitation capture, and water desalination. brackish or oceanic water.

    “Climate change alone should be enough to force us to rethink our water supply systems because they were built for a climate that no longer exists,” Gleick said.

    Former US Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman said drought conditions could have major implications for one of the country’s biggest sectors – our food supply. He called on the federal government and corresponding agencies to provide short-term aid to farmers, such as larger disaster payments and crop insurance programs.

    There are some best practices that private farmers and food production companies are using to alleviate the effects of drought, he said, but these practices are not widespread in the agricultural industry. The next step is to implement shared practices regionally, even nationally, he said.

    “Unless we modernize our food production techniques, we will be increasingly vulnerable to these great climate changes, which we will be facing for a long time,” said Glickman.

    PHOTOS: Drought is depleting California reservoirs

    And not only are the drought conditions damaging the country’s economic system and food supply, it also puts farmers’ livelihoods at risk, said Susana De Anda of the California-based Community Water Center. In rural areas, water becomes a central force in keeping families afloat.

    “The reality is that droughts are impacting already stressful, already at risk communities … many of whom have not had clean water for a decade,” De Anda said.

    Bidtah Becker of the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority said 30 to 40 percent of residents on Navajo lands lack pipes in their homes. She is part of the management team of the Water & Tribes Initiative, which advocates for the sustainability of water on the Colorado River for tribal communities.

    While there are challenges, Becker said it might be encouraging to consider traditional Navajo teachings, which say change is part of human life. This obstacle could simply mean focusing on new ways to adapt to life on Earth, she said.

    “For the first time in almost 20 years of career, there are so many people talking about drought and water who want to take a holistic approach,” Becker said.


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    Buenos Aires Hours | Another chaotic Copa Libertadores clash? Normal service has resumed. https://dagulfsghost.com/buenos-aires-hours-another-chaotic-copa-libertadores-clash-normal-service-has-resumed/ https://dagulfsghost.com/buenos-aires-hours-another-chaotic-copa-libertadores-clash-normal-service-has-resumed/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/buenos-aires-hours-another-chaotic-copa-libertadores-clash-normal-service-has-resumed/ After two months in which the comings and goings of Argentina’s Copa América winners made the headlines, normal service has now resumed. Boca Juniors are now the only word on the lips of any football fan, after the giants crashed out of the Copa Libertadores in a fiery, if not very controversial way. After seeing […]]]>

    After two months in which the comings and goings of Argentina’s Copa América winners made the headlines, normal service has now resumed. Boca Juniors are now the only word on the lips of any football fan, after the giants crashed out of the Copa Libertadores in a fiery, if not very controversial way.

    After seeing Diego González’s goal in the first leg of the round of 16 against Atlético Mineiro ruled out for a minute of foul in the preparation, lightning struck twice for the Xeneize in the return leg. Moreover, González was in the thick of the action again, with his offside knee held back by referee Esteban Ostojich – instantly losing the hero status gained thanks to his stern but fair referee in the Copa final. America for at least half of Argentina’s population – and VAR as reason enough to rule out Marcelo Weigandt’s point blank strike.

    The rest is history. After three of the worst penalties we are likely to see this year, Boca was out of the game: an elimination that was marked by an ongoing battle with police and security guards in the Estadio Mineirão tunnel, flying water dispensers and fire extinguishers and a night camped outside a Belo Horizonte police station as the culprits were forced to give statements to the authorities before being finally released on bail.

    Unsurprisingly, Boca’s official reaction to events preferred to dwell on the injustice of VAR rather than the chaotic scenes that followed.

    “Boca Juniors suffered in this Copa Libertadores match against Atlético Mineiro two inexplicable decisions annulling legal goals which destroyed the sportsmanship of the most prestigious tournament on the continent”, said Tuesday evening a statement signed by the president of the Jorge Amor Ameal club. “Today our members, fans, players and coaches have been injured in this crass way, with this malicious and biased use of VAR technology. The events mark something unprecedented, the only time a club has been eliminated. of the competition after winning both games of the draw.

    That hyperbolic last sentence aside, and regardless of the allegations about past arbitration decisions, it’s hard not to objectively sympathize with Boca. Falling under the spell of VAR twice in as many games is unfortunate to say the least, although the two incidents, taken in isolation, were far from clear anyway. The real problem, setting aside the fantastic claims of malice and anti-Xeneize conspiracy, is one that continues to harass Argentine and South American football – those tasked with running it on the pitch are simply not up to the task.

    From the World Cup qualifiers in early June, through the Copa América and now the Libertadores, it has become clear that implementing VAR at the continental level poses more problems than it solves. From endless waits for decisions to mistakes as glaring as those that preceded technology – Boca’s uproar aside, Uruguay were denied a clear goal against Paraguay due to a non-existent offside and Cerro Porteño suffered an almost identical fate against Fluminense last week – and the prevailing feeling that any decision is worth harassing the referee in the hope that he will give in and turn to the cameras, the general opinion of the match officials are probably as weak as they have ever been. Perhaps the current fan ban is actually a blessing in disguise, because in this context it is easy to imagine how some of these decisions would have been received in the stands.

    One can only hope that these serious issues are just starting pains for what is still a (relatively) new phenomenon, and that with practice and experience, referees and those stuck in the VAR booth become more proficient both with their decisions and, almost as important, how they are made and communicated to players and fans. That moment, however, seems far away, and as long as the current unease with officials persists, the prospect of horrific explosions like that of the Mineirão will remain a danger.

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    27th NRCE to inspire retail makeover into the new normal https://dagulfsghost.com/27th-nrce-to-inspire-retail-makeover-into-the-new-normal/ https://dagulfsghost.com/27th-nrce-to-inspire-retail-makeover-into-the-new-normal/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/27th-nrce-to-inspire-retail-makeover-into-the-new-normal/ MANILA, Philippines – This year’s National Virtual Retail Conference and Exhibition (NRCE) hosted by the Philippine Retailers Association will see key players and players in the Philippine retail industry meet experts as they find new ideas for repurposing malls and thinking about strategic ways to get consumers to shop in physical stores. Scheduled for August […]]]>

    MANILA, Philippines – This year’s National Virtual Retail Conference and Exhibition (NRCE) hosted by the Philippine Retailers Association will see key players and players in the Philippine retail industry meet experts as they find new ideas for repurposing malls and thinking about strategic ways to get consumers to shop in physical stores.

    Scheduled for August 12-13, the 27th edition of NRCE will feature SM Supermalls Vice President for Corporate Strategy, Gino Borromeo, as he dwells on “Reimagining the Mall of the Future”. Alfamart Trading Philippines COO Harvey Ong will also join esteemed speakers from around the world to share his uplifting and groundbreaking vision for the session titled “#EngagementMatters: Employee engagement and management in the Next Normal”.

    To reserve a slot, visit www.nrce-ph.com, email nrceph@gmail.com or call the PRA secretariat at 8687-4180 at 81.

    The highly anticipated return of the retail industry’s biggest event is made possible by the following sponsors: Globe Business, PLDT Enterprise, Bench, Wilcon Depot, The SM Store, Robinsons Malls, Vasavah Consultancy, The Philippine STAR, Springtime Design, BusinessWorld, Media Blitz Group, 96.3 WRock, CMG Retail and Rich Graphix Brand.


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