Psychic – Dagulfs Ghost http://dagulfsghost.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 11:18:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://dagulfsghost.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-2-150x150.png Psychic – Dagulfs Ghost http://dagulfsghost.com/ 32 32 Researchers explore how cannabis affects cognition and psychology https://dagulfsghost.com/researchers-explore-how-cannabis-affects-cognition-and-psychology/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:02:01 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/researchers-explore-how-cannabis-affects-cognition-and-psychology/ EDITOR’S NOTE – In May 2021, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed into law a measure that allows people with a qualifying medical condition to purchase what is commonly referred to as medical marijuana. Medical marijuana, or medical cannabis, is derived from the Cannabis sativa plant, which has mood-altering chemical properties and is often used recreationally. […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE – In May 2021, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed into law a measure that allows people with a qualifying medical condition to purchase what is commonly referred to as medical marijuana. Medical marijuana, or medical cannabis, is derived from the Cannabis sativa plant, which has mood-altering chemical properties and is often used recreationally. Cannabis contains two compounds: THC, which makes people feel high, and CBD, which many believe has medicinal properties. As the discussion of these medical uses continues, this research article from The Conversation provides some interesting insights into the potential harms of prolonged marijuana use, especially by and for young people. The Alabama Baptist provides this information as a resource for our readers, and not as an endorsement of the researchers or any publication or website cited in the article.


Cannabis has been used by humans for thousands of years and is one of the most popular [recreational] drugs today. With effects such as feelings of joy and relaxation, it is also legal to prescribe or take in several countries.

But how does drug use affect the mind? In three recent studies, published in The Journal of Psychopharmacology, Neuropsychopharmacology and the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacologywe show that it can influence a number of cognitive and psychological processes.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime reported that in 2018, approximately 192 million people worldwide between the ages of 15 and 64 used cannabis recreationally. Young adults are particularly fond, with 35% of people between 18 and 25 use it, while only 10% of people over 26 do.

This indicates that the main users are teenagers and young adults, brains are still developing. They can therefore be particularly vulnerable to the effects of cannabis use on the brain in the longer term.

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It acts on the “endocannabinoid system” of the brain, which are receptors that respond to the chemicals in cannabis. Cannabis receptors are densely populated in the prefrontal and limbic areas of the brain, which are involved in reward and motivation. They regulate the signaling of brain chemicals, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate.

We know that dopamine is involved in motivation, reward, and learning. GABA and glutamate play a role in cognitive processes, including learning and memory.

Cognitive effects

Cannabis use can affect cognition, especially in people with cannabis use disorders. This is characterized by a persistent desire to use the drug and disruption of daily activities, such as work or education. It was estimated that approximately 10% of cannabis users meet the diagnostic criteria for this disorder.

In our research, we tested the cognition of 39 people with the disorder (who were asked to potty train on the day of the test) and compared it to that of 20 people who never or rarely used cannabis. . We showed that participants with the disease performed significantly worse on memory tests from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) compared to controls, who had never or very rarely used cannabis. It also negatively affected their “executive functions,” which are mental processes involving flexible thinking. This effect appears to be related to the age at which people started taking the drug – the younger they were, the more their executive functioning was impaired.

Cognitive impairments have also been observed in light cannabis users. These users tend to do riskier decisions than others and have more problems with planning.

Although most studies have been conducted on men, there are was the proof gender differences in the effects of cannabis use on cognition. We showed that while male cannabis users had poorer memory for visually recognizing things, female users had more problems with attention and executive functions. These sex-related effects persisted when controlling for age; IQ; alcohol and nicotine consumption; mood and anxiety symptoms; emotional stability; and impulsive behavior.

Reward, motivation and sanity

Cannabis use can also affect how we feel, further influencing how we think. For example, some previous research has suggested that reward and motivation—and the brain circuits involved in these processes— can be disturbed when we use cannabis. It can affect our performance in school or work, as it can make us less motivated to work hard and less rewarded when we do well.

In our recent study, we used a brain imaging task, in which participants were placed in a scanner and viewed orange or blue squares. The orange squares would lead to a monetary reward, after a delay, if the participant responded. This setup helped us study how the brain responds to rewards. We particularly focused on the ventral striatum, which is a key region of the brain’s reward system. We found that the effects on the reward system in the brain were subtle, with no direct effects of cannabis in the ventral striatum. However, the participants in our study were moderate cannabis users. Effects may be more pronounced in cannabis users with more severe and chronic use, as seen in cannabis use disorder.

There is also evidence that cannabis can lead to mental health issues. We have shown that it is linked to higher “anhedonia” – an inability to feel pleasure – in adolescents. Interestingly, this effect was particularly pronounced during the lockdowns related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cannabis use during adolescence has also been reported as a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences as well as schizophrenia. A study has shown that cannabis use moderately increases the risk of psychotic symptoms in young people, but that it has a much stronger effect in those with a predisposition to psychosis (scoring high on a checklist of symptoms of paranoid thinking and psychoticism).

Assessing 2,437 adolescents and young adults (14-24 years old), the authors reported a six percentage point increased risk – from 15% to 21% – of psychotic symptoms in cannabis users without a predisposition to psychosis. But there was a 26-point increase in the risk – from 25% to 51% – of psychotic symptoms in cannabis users prone to psychosis.

Neurobiology

We don’t really know why cannabis is linked to psychotic episodes, but hypotheses suggest dopamine and glutamate can be important in the neurobiology of these conditions.

Another study of 780 adolescents suggested that the association between cannabis use and psychotic experiences was also linked to a region of the brain called the “uncus.” This is located in the Para hippocampus (involved in memory) and the olfactory bulb (involved in the processing of odors), and has a large number of cannabinoid receptors. It has also been previously associated with schizophrenia and psychotic experiences.

The cognitive and psychological effects of cannabis use are ultimately likely to depend to some degree on dosage (frequency, duration, and strength), gender, genetic vulnerabilities, and age of onset. But we need to determine whether these effects are temporary or permanent. An article summarizing numerous studies suggested that with light cannabis use, the effects may weaken after periods of abstinence.

But even if that’s the case, it’s clearly worth considering the effects prolonged cannabis use can have on our minds – especially for young people whose brains are still developing.


Barbara Jacquelyn Sahakianprofessor of clinical neuropsychology, University of Cambridge; Christine LangleyPostdoctoral Researcher, Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Cambridge; Martine SkumlienPhD Candidate in Psychiatry, University of Cambridgeand Tianye Jiaprofessor of population neuroscience, Fudan University

This article is republished from The conversation under Creative Commons license. Read it original article.


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POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY: Why going out is nature’s way to keep us all a little more grounded https://dagulfsghost.com/positive-psychology-why-going-out-is-natures-way-to-keep-us-all-a-little-more-grounded/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 20:01:56 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/positive-psychology-why-going-out-is-natures-way-to-keep-us-all-a-little-more-grounded/ A FEW weekends ago the clocks moved forward, signaling the noticeable start of longer and brighter days. We have even experienced abnormally hot weather over the past few weeks. With the shift to working from home for so many people, people are increasingly looking outside to break up their day and create a boundary between […]]]>

A FEW weekends ago the clocks moved forward, signaling the noticeable start of longer and brighter days. We have even experienced abnormally hot weather over the past few weeks.

With the shift to working from home for so many people, people are increasingly looking outside to break up their day and create a boundary between home and office. People took to walking, hiking, biking and swimming in the open air in increasing numbers.

We intuitively know that being outdoors, connecting with nature is good for us. Scientists attribute this in part to the fact that mankind evolved and lived outdoors in wild landscapes for many, many years. Plus, we know exercise is good for us, of course. Does this mean that exercising outside is even better for our well-being? In this week’s article, we explore the evidence-based benefits of outdoor activities for our physical and mental well-being.

From a physical perspective, there is evidence in the scientific literature that being in nature while being more active outdoors is good for our cardiovascular health, blood pressure, gut health, eyesight, bone health and for the functioning of the nervous system and the immune system. .

Nature can contribute to the proper functioning of mental health both in prevention and in treatment. Recent studies have yielded results that suggest nature helps with emotional regulation and cognitive functions such as memory, attention, the ability to focus and concentrate, problem solving, and creativity.

When we’re outdoors in daylight, we reap the benefits of vitamin D, which many of us lack. Vitamin D is involved in the process of converting tryptophan into serotonin. Serotonin is known as the happiness chemical and can help relieve depression. Seasonal affective disorder, a type of mood disorder that most often affects people during the winter months, is thought to be linked to the lack of natural light.

Being outdoors in nature is associated with relief from low mood and anxiety. When we’re out in nature, we give our minds and eyes a break from our ubiquitous screens. This helps alleviate the dry eyes and headaches that are often an undesirable aspect of spending so much time ‘plugged in’. Looking at nature, colors, shapes and textures are pleasant and soothing and can provide a different center of attention.

Psychoevolutionary theory (advocated by Ulrich, 1983) suggests that holding back in

closed and artificial environments can evoke emotions such as anger, depression and despair. The literature also cites the grounding theory as a reason why nature can contribute to our well-being; Foot-to-ground connection with soil, grass, or sand has been associated with better sleep and well-being and reduced stress and pain.

Scientists also suggest that we absorb beneficial substances when we breathe in the fresh air of nature – beneficial bacteria, plant-derived essential oils and negatively charged ions. Apparently, there are relatively high levels of negative ions in forests and near bodies of water. These ions are involved in biochemical reactions that also increase serotonin levels in our body. Perhaps that’s why a hike in the Slieve Blooms, a trip to Lough Boora or Lough Owel or even a walk along our canals can be so restorative.

The term “forest bathing” for physical and mental well-being seems to originate from Japan. ‘Forest bathing’ is a translation of the Japanese term ‘shinrin yoku’, which has been defined in literature as coming into contact with and soaking up the atmosphere of the forest. Closer to home, the NHS (National Health Service) prescribes ‘green exercise’ as a way to improve mental health and physical well-being in the UK. In one region of Canada, the standard nature prescription given by GPs is two hours a week, outdoors in nature with a minimum of 20 minutes per session.

This exposure to outdoor activities can range from just being in your backyard to hiking along mountain trails. This prescription of nature has a name: ecotherapy.

What if you live in an urban center, town or city? What if access to nature was not as simple as it seems? Well, the good news is that studies suggest that even having plants in your home

can contribute to well-being. Moreover, even looking at nature through the window – the tree outside, the green in front, the blue sky – can reduce our stress levels and help trigger this parasympathetic nervous system, i.e. our ability to “rest and digest”.

Research has also shown that people recover faster from operations if their hospital bed gives them a view of trees and nature rather than concrete and buildings. Even looking at pictures of nature can be soothing. Engaging our imagination to conjure up and visualize a scene from nature, appealing to our senses – touch, taste, hearing and smell as well as vision – can be truly therapeutic and is an important part of any box. to wellness tools for the client and the clinician .

Julie O’Flaherty and Imelda Ferguson are licensed clinical psychologists, both based in private practice in Tullamore. Through Mind Your Self Midlands, they run positive psychology and mindfulness classes throughout the year.

They will be presenting a practical half-day course on how to manage and reduce stress, anxiety and worry next Monday, April 25. This course, A Morning of Mindfulness and Positive Psychology will take place at the Central Hotel, Main Street, Tullamore (opposite Lidl) from 10am to 1pm. The price of the course is €90 and includes course material, tea/coffee and hotel parking. For more information or to reserve a place, contact: Imelda on 087 2271630 or Julie on 087 2399328 or send a private message on their Mind Your Self Midlands Facebook page.

They can also be contacted through the Find a Psychologist section of the Psychological Society of Ireland website. www.psychologicalsociety.ie


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Online Psychology Counseling Market 2021 https://dagulfsghost.com/online-psychology-counseling-market-2021/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 07:54:55 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/online-psychology-counseling-market-2021/ The research report on Global Online Psychological Counseling Market Take a closer look at several factors that could potentially influence the growth trajectory of the market over the forecast period 2021 to 2027. The report provides a data-backed assessment of key market trends, barriers, and opportunities. It also presents information on various segments of the […]]]>

Online Psychological Counseling Market

The research report on Global Online Psychological Counseling Market Take a closer look at several factors that could potentially influence the growth trajectory of the market over the forecast period 2021 to 2027. The report provides a data-backed assessment of key market trends, barriers, and opportunities. It also presents information on various segments of the online psychological counseling market. Through detailed primary and secondary research, the authors of the report provide estimates on the market valuation at the end of the forecast period. Through historical data and trend analysis, the report provides valuable insights into pricing, marketing, and advertising models in the Online Psychology Counseling market.

Get a free sample PDF (including full TOC, tables and figures) from Market@ https://www.researchmoz.us/enquiry.php? type=S&repid=3353633

Key regions of the Global Online Psychology Counseling Market have been assessed to gauge lucrative investment opportunities for industry players. Regions where specific end-use industries are expected to drive demand in the market have been highlighted. The business intelligence study on the Global Online Psychology Counseling Market showcases crucial insights about these key regions such as size, demographics, consumer buying behavior and current regional market trends. The study presents an in-depth assessment of the competitive landscape in the global online psychological counseling market. It presents the nature of the competition, the size and the share of the incumbent players in the market.

The recent outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced every industry in the world. Companies were looking for creative ways to meet the challenges posed by this unforeseen disaster. The study analyzes the impact of the pandemic on the global online psychological counseling market. It highlights various business models that have emerged during the pandemic. It also assesses the potential opportunities created in various regions of the world. The report takes a closer look at various strategies implemented by leading Online Psychology Counseling market players to retain business agility in the pre-COVID-19 era.

Online Psychological Counseling Market

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Global Online Psychological Counseling Market Segment By Manufacturers: BetterHelp, Talkspace, Dr. Kaili Chen, ReSourceTCC, Yixinli, Jiandanxinli, Cotree
Major Types of Online Psychology Consulting Market Covered:
  • Online therapy
  • Online booking
Application Segments Covered in the Market
  • love and marriage
  • parent and child
  • Professional life
  • Health
  • Other

The report examines some important questions regarding the future of the global online psychology counseling market. These questions include:

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  • Which segments are expected to experience increased demand during the forecast period?
  • What are the buying patterns of customers in the global online psychological counseling market?
  • What are the strategies employed by the key players to stay ahead of their competitors?
  • What are the challenges faced by the manufacturers in the global online psychology counseling market?
  • Which segments have been hit hard by the pandemic and subsequent lockdowns?
  • What are the hurdles faced by aspiring players to enter the online psychology counseling market?

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Should a cup of coffee cause panic? https://dagulfsghost.com/should-a-cup-of-coffee-cause-panic/ Thu, 24 Mar 2022 17:22:08 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/should-a-cup-of-coffee-cause-panic/ Source: Photo by Liya Zerya Konuş from Pexels A recent article online said that if we have a panic attack after a cup of coffee, that doesn’t mean we have a problem; the problem is the caffeine. Not so. Although caffeine can trigger panic, caffeine is not the problem. The problem is that our parasympathetic […]]]>

Source: Photo by Liya Zerya Konuş from Pexels

A recent article online said that if we have a panic attack after a cup of coffee, that doesn’t mean we have a problem; the problem is the caffeine.

Not so. Although caffeine can trigger panic, caffeine is not the problem. The problem is that our parasympathetic system is not doing its job. When stress hormones are released due to caffeine or any other stimulus, our parasympathetic nervous system is supposed to limit arousal. Our level of arousal is believed to be regulated by these competing systems:

  • The sympathetic nervous system: This system gets its name from the fact that it works “in sympathy” with stress hormones. When stress hormones increase, the sympathetic system increases heart rate, breathing rate, and sweating. It also redirects blood supplying the digestive system to the muscles. This takes place to prepare the body to flee or fight.
  • The parasympathetic nervous system: This system has the prefix “para” which means against. When the sympathetic begins to excite us, the parasympathetic is believed to repel by slowing heart rate, breathing rate, and reducing sweating. It also restores blood supply to the digestive system.

Hyper excitement

Many of us have not developed the necessary psychological processes to automatically activate our parasympathetic system. If we lack process, when stress hormones are triggered, the sympathetic system has free rein. Depending on the amount of stress hormones released, the sympathetic system can cause hyper-arousal. Hyper-arousal alone does not cause panic. In addition, the person must believe:

  • They are in danger
  • They can’t fight the danger
  • They can’t run away from danger

A person may believe they are in danger for various reasons:

  • They are frightened by the hyper-excitement
  • They don’t know what feelings mean
  • They fear they are having a heart attack
  • They are afraid of going crazy
  • They fear losing control
  • They may have experienced these feelings before when they were in danger or traumatized
  • The hyper-arousal impaired their reality check and allowed memory or imagination of a traumatic event to be experienced as happening

Excitation normalization

If a child is lucky, an emotionally available parent has shared varying levels of excitement with the child. In a workshop on emotional regulation, neuro-psychologist Allan Schore presented a video of a young girl and her mother sharing varying levels of arousal. The girl smiled at her mother. His mother smiled back. The mother’s response made the daughter smile even more, causing the mother to respond with a bigger smile. Seeing her mother’s biggest smile, the girl giggled in delight. This delighted the mother, who then laughed.

In this way, the girl and her mother accelerated to a peak of excitement. And then, as if climbing a ladder to the top, they descended to a level of stillness. By sharing a range of feelings of excitement, the child has learned that all of these levels are safe.

But if a child is unlucky and unable to share the full range of arousal with an attentive caregiver, they may not experience all levels of arousal safely. If so, a high level of arousal can cause fear, which triggers additional stress hormones, which can lead to increased arousal, etc. When a person feels threatened by arousal, they can use a distraction exercise such as The 5-4-3-2-1 exercise to regulate downwards.

Hyper-arousal can alter the sense of reality

Ordinarily, the mind generates a sense of identity, place and time. When overwhelmed, the mind may temporarily stop producing one or more of these senses:

  1. Loss of sense of time: The disappearance of time can allow the memory of a traumatic experience that took place in the past to be experienced as occurring in the present. This is called a flashback. A flashback, if overwhelming, can feel like panic. Or, when time disappears, the imagination of a highly improbable but disastrous event can turn into a terrifying experience that happens. Consider it a flash-forward. For example, faced with an upcoming flight, a fearful airman spoke of a flight that crashed. He said, “When they got on that plane, they didn’t expect it to crash.” He added, “Can you imagine what it’s like to know you’re about to die for ten minutes!” The implication is that the experience would be unbearable. Then he imagined himself as a passenger on a doomed plane. Imagining the terror he would feel would trigger the release of stress hormones. The stress hormones made his sense of time collapse. He experienced what he imagined might happen in the future as a reality in the present. He said, “I just know if I get on that plane it’s going to crash.” Although he did not panic, the same psychological maneuver, if performed in flight, can cause panic. For example, when a passenger on an airplane imagines that the plane might fall from the sky, the stress hormones he releases can cause him to experience panic similar to that if the plane were actually falling from the sky.
  2. Loss of sense of location: As stress hormones defeat reality checks, we lose sight of where we are. This loss places us inside the movie that we invent in our mind. We lose the ability to escape. Now, deep within a movie of our own making, we believe that what we imagine is actually happening and that we are about to die. I once took a friend to a balcony that overlooks Piazza San Marco in Venice. As we walked through the door and onto the balcony, she shouted, “Get me out of here! Get me out of here!” For her, this expansive view was overwhelming. All she needed to be relieved was to turn around and go back through the door she had just left, to regain her sense of where she was.
  3. Loss of sense of identity: Normally, without being aware that we are doing so, we generate a self-image, a sense of who we are. When overwhelmed, the mind’s ability to produce this sense of identity weakens. As our sense of who we are fades, we may be gripped with the terror that our existence will also fade.

Panic

When we have no control over such experiences, and no way to escape them, we can panic and experience the “fight, flight, or freeze” phenomenon. From an evolutionary perspective, the most primitive response to danger is to freeze. This ancient answer is still rooted in us. We cannot deliberately cause or prevent the freeze response. When the Freeze Reaction takes place, it’s usually in a situation where it’s impossible to fight or flee from a threat. Freezing takes us from hyper-arousal to hypo-arousal and renders us unable to function.

Avoid triggers

Although we can try to avoid hyper-arousal by avoiding all triggers, this is considered a disorder called agoraphobia. It is healthier to establish the necessary psychological processes to allow the parasympathetic system to do its job. A properly responding parasympathetic system prevents hyper-arousal. Just as your car’s brakes can override the gas pedal, your parasympathetic system can override the sympathetic system. None of us would drive a car without brakes, but many of us have no choice but to operate without the psychological processes necessary to activate our emotional brakes.

If we have the necessary psychological processes, when stress hormones are released, our parasympathetic system overrules the stress hormones so quickly that there may not be a feeling of stress. If we lack these processes, when the stress hormones are released, a feeling of arousal occurs which continues until the stress hormones burn off, which takes about 90 seconds. This can cause us to avoid situations where stress hormones might be released. The fear that these feelings will lead to panic can make us unable to fly. If the flight is smooth, we may be able to tolerate it. But if there is turbulence, the amygdala interprets the downward movement of the plane as falling. Every time the plane descends, the amygdala of every passenger, not just fearful passengers, releases stress hormones. In a passenger who has good automatic emotional braking, the effects of stress hormones are controlled. In a passenger who does not have automatic parasympathetic activation, every downward movement causes alarm. Since there is one downward movement after another, additional stress hormones are released before the previously released hormones can burn off.

Leading neuroscientist Stephen Porges discovered that when we are with someone who is in no way a threat, signals are transmitted unconsciously through their face, voice, and body language that activate our parasympathetic system. We can use this discovery to establish the psychological processes necessary to automatically activate our parasympathetic system. The following exercise is adapted from Without panic, my book on how to increase the automatic regulation of emotions. Dr. Porges gave an afterword on the application of his finding that therapists may find useful in their work with clients:

  1. First, think of someone you feel physically and emotionally safe with. For this exercise, you need someone who is easy-going, non-critical, and non-judgmental.
  2. As you go through your day, look for the first sensations you feel when stress hormones are released.
  3. Stop what you are doing. Look across the room and pretend to see the door open. Imagine you see your friend come in. As you imagine his face, your parasympathetic system will begin to activate.
  4. Imagine hearing his voice say hello to you. This will help activate your parasympathetic system.
  5. Finally, pretend they’re coming over and giving you a huge, high five, or other physical touch appropriate to your relationship.

It is this intentional activation of your calming parasympathetic system whenever you feel an increase in stress that will allow you to establish the psychological processes necessary to automatically activate your parasympathetic system when stress builds up.


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WNC psychology professor receives Regents’ Award | Carson City Nevada News https://dagulfsghost.com/wnc-psychology-professor-receives-regents-award-carson-city-nevada-news/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/wnc-psychology-professor-receives-regents-award-carson-city-nevada-news/ Exit from Western Nevada College Dr. Rebecca Bevans has been a faculty member at Western Nevada College since 2017, and it didn’t take long for her to be recognized with one of the most prestigious honors in higher education in the state. The WNC psychology professor has been selected as the recipient of the 2022 […]]]>

Dr. Rebecca Bevans has been a faculty member at Western Nevada College since 2017, and it didn’t take long for her to be recognized with one of the most prestigious honors in higher education in the state.

The WNC psychology professor has been selected as the recipient of the 2022 Nevada Regents Teaching Award – an honor presented by the Nevada Higher Education System today at its quarterly meeting in Henderson.

“It’s wonderful to be recognized for my hard work and dedication to our students,” she said. “It is thanks to the support of my colleagues and colleagues that I am able to do what I do. I am very grateful for this support and for this award.

WNC Acting President Dr. J. Kyle Dalpe has seen the impact Dr. Bevans has had on students over the past few years and knows that she will continue to support and motivate WNC students going forward. ‘coming.

“Dr. Bevans works tirelessly to support our students in the classroom and outside,” said President Dalpe. what she will do in the future.”

Some of the psychology courses she runs are Introduction to Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Child Development, Adolescent Psychology, and Social Psychology. Although Dr. Bevans became a full-time faculty member in 2017, she has taught at the WNC since 2007.

“Teaching is exciting for me!” said Rebecca. “Students arrive with questions and we work to find answers. I love supporting them in their acquisition of knowledge. My students not only learn psychology, but they also learn more about themselves.

Interestingly, the longer Dr. Bevans teaches at WNC, the more shoulders she has. She is a counselor for the Psychology and Nerd Herd (a club for homeschool students who attend WNC). Bevans is also the homeschool student coordinator and has helped to significantly increase the enrollment of these students.

“Dr. Bevans’ positive impact on the WNC community is seen not only in the classroom, but also in the success of our programs and the access we provide Nevada students,” said Scott Morrison, Director academic of WNC’s Liberal Arts Division “Her expertise in psychology has inspired WNC students for more than 10 years, and she has built a pipeline in science with engaging classroom presentations and top-notch online courses. In the areas of student support and recruitment, Dr. Bevans’ work with the home schooling community has helped WNC become a leader in innovative dual credit opportunities for our future leaders. is well deserved and his success is representative of Western’s high caliber of professionalism.

Additionally, in 2019, she brought former NHL goaltender Clint Malarchuk to campus to speak to the community about mental health issues. As Chair of the Healthy Campus Committee in 2016, she was instrumental in implementing WNC’s tobacco-free campus policy.

Forbes magazine featured Dr. Bevans in 2019 for his work on food coloring consumption. To name just a few of his community efforts, Dr. Bevans volunteers at the Nevada State Railroad Museum and for Sassabration, a celebration of community diversity.

Prior to becoming a professor at WNC, she was a highly successful adjunct faculty member at the college. And, yes, she did it very well too. For the 2016-2017 school year, she was voted adjunct faculty member of the year.
Dr. Bevans received her Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology (Cognitive and Brain Sciences) from the University of Nevada, Reno.


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Stuttgart’s Matarazzo turns to psychology in relegation battle https://dagulfsghost.com/stuttgarts-matarazzo-turns-to-psychology-in-relegation-battle/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/stuttgarts-matarazzo-turns-to-psychology-in-relegation-battle/ Berlin (AFP) – VfB Stuttgart’s American coach Pellegrino Matarazzo admits his job involves psychology as much as football coaching in the fight to keep his club in the Bundesliga. Matarazzo’s side are second in the table and four points from safety with 10 games remaining. “The battle to avoid relegation is very, very psychological,” he […]]]>

Berlin (AFP) – VfB Stuttgart’s American coach Pellegrino Matarazzo admits his job involves psychology as much as football coaching in the fight to keep his club in the Bundesliga.

Matarazzo’s side are second in the table and four points from safety with 10 games remaining.

“The battle to avoid relegation is very, very psychological,” he told reporters in a virtual interview.

“There is a lot of pressure. This club is ginormous with a large fan base. You feel the need to win.

“The more pressure you have, the more you have to be a psychologist rather than a football coach.”

Matarazzo propelled Stuttgart to ninth place last season in their first year back in the German top flight, but they have struggled this season and are on a nine-game winless streak.

Yet Matarazzo is unwavering.

“If I’m not convinced that we’ll stay in the league, I’m not the right guy.

“I’m 100% sure that this team will get enough points.”

He is adamant despite a torrid season.

A shoulder problem sidelined top scorer Sasa Kalajdzic in the first half of the campaign.

Injuries and Covid cases have meant Matarazzo used 31 players in the first 17 games – the most of any Bundesliga club.

– ‘Rough and bumpy’ –

“We had a tough and bumpy first run of the season,” he admitted. “Without making any apologies, it was just a continued destabilization of the team.”

Typical of their fortunes this season, Stuttgart led with five minutes remaining at Hoffenheim last Friday, only to concede two late goals in a 2-1 defeat.

This followed a 1-1 draw at home when visitors Bochum equalized in the 94th minute.

“Against Hoffenheim you felt the fear of losing set in,” Matarazzo said.

“My approach is never to call it luck – it’s about investing a few percent more.

“All we need is a win to get the ball rolling.”

The 44-year-old’s journey to coaching in the Bundesliga was unconventional.

Born in New Jersey to an Italian family, Matarazzo’s passion for football was ignited by Diego Maradona’s TV highlights during his heyday for Napoli in the 1980s.

“My family were big fans of Maradona and Napoli,” he explains.

“After Sunday dinner, we would go to the park. I would be Maradona and I would live this fantasy and this passion. It was a big part of growing up.

Although he received a degree in mathematics from Columbia University in New York, the young Matarazzo traveled to Europe to play football.

After unsuccessful trials with Italian clubs, the defender played in Germany’s lower leagues.

After hanging up his boots 10 years ago, Matarazzo studied for his coaching license on the same course as current Bayern Munich boss Julian Nagelsmann.

The pair hit it off and Matarazzo eventually joined Nagelsmann’s coaching staff at Hoffenheim in 2017.

“I went abroad knowing that if it didn’t work out I would use my college degree to get into the corporate world, but I never seemed to stop climbing the coaching ranks.”

He was appointed Stuttgart head coach in December 2019, but this season has given Matarazzo sleepless nights.

“Especially after games when you’re wired and going through situations.

“I handle the pressure knowing there are parts I can influence and parts I can’t. I give 100%, which gives me peace knowing I’m doing all I can.

– Impeccable German –

After spending the last 20 years in Germany, the American is fluent in German — much to his embarrassment.

“I think in German and look for words when I speak English,” Matarazzo admits with a laugh.

“I translate what I want to say in English, which is rather embarrassing.

“The worst thing for me was when I came home and my aunt said to me, ‘You have a (German) accent’.”

Matarazzo faces the challenge of keeping his players focused, with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine an obvious concern for all.

“It’s a big part of our lives right now – it’s something that you know you don’t want to be a part of or close to,” he said.

“When you get on the pitch, you can get distracted and get overwhelmed by the game.

“We keep moving forward, remain optimistic and hope for a better future.”


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Genome science: skeptics are angry and rejecters retreat https://dagulfsghost.com/genome-science-skeptics-are-angry-and-rejecters-retreat/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 23:53:16 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/genome-science-skeptics-are-angry-and-rejecters-retreat/ It’s no secret that a tiny but perhaps growing portion of Americans are deeply angry with many, if not all, societal and political institutions. On the right, reasons for the furor include fear of racial or gender replacement, belief that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, anxiety about the chances of economic improvement, and fear […]]]>

It’s no secret that a tiny but perhaps growing portion of Americans are deeply angry with many, if not all, societal and political institutions. On the right, reasons for the furor include fear of racial or gender replacement, belief that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, anxiety about the chances of economic improvement, and fear that the international domination of the America is moving away.

On the left, reasons for the fury include the perception that white or male supremacy is overwhelming and unchangeable, that the state is repressive and violent rather than liberal or democratic, and that people only care about themselves and nothing from others.

Leftists talk about fascism and Nazism. Right-wingers talk about communism and socialism; there seems to be nothing new under the sun, at least in terms of American opprobrium.

My contribution to this angsty non-dialogue is to extend it to something genuinely new – the ways in which Americans explain their views on the use of genomic science in society.

A previous article on Our Complicated Views pointed out that Americans’ views on the societal use of genomics are poorly explained by partisanship or ideology, race or gender, education or scientific knowledge, religion or religiosity, or other characteristics that social scientists use to explain variation in attitudes.

Instead, views fall into four mostly psychological categories: Enthusiasts see genomic science as important in explaining human behavior and full of promise; Hopefuls consider genetics not very important but nevertheless see the benefits of science; Skeptics see genetics as important but worry about its risks; and rejecters do not view genetics as important and do not anticipate the benefits of science.

Organizing views across this typology emerged from two large representative online surveys of American adults in 2011 and 2018. In these, I asked parallel sets of questions about views on medical biobanks and forensic DNA databases (without using these terms). After respondents read a brief explanation and answered some attitude questions about medical biobanks, the survey asked them if they would be willing to contribute a DNA sample to one. Respondents then saw a text box asking why they would be ready [or unwilling, depending on the prior response] to contribute. The same procedure is followed for forensic DNA databases.

I expected a few hundred comments that I could analyze for an article and sprinkle the book with illuminating vignettes. Instead, across the two surveys and the two questions, I received nearly 10,000 responses. Some were uncodable or irrelevant, but over several years a small army of research assistants and I coded almost 8,000 of them according to several schemes. A coding scheme says a lot about the anger of Americans.

Going through the details, about three-fifths of Americans are enthusiasts, with more than two-thirds of whom would contribute to medical or forensic DNA databases, or both. More than a quarter of Americans are optimists, of which about three-fifths would contribute. About 6% are skeptics and 6% are rejecters; nearly a third of Skeptics and about a quarter of Rejectors would contribute.

In short, far more Americans are enthusiastic about the benefits of genomics science, or at least hopeful, than skeptical about using or rejecting genomics from the whole scientific enterprise. The most enthusiastic are the most willing to contribute, while the strongest opponents are the least willing; not a surprise, but reassuring about the validity of my categories (which were taken from totally separate indices). Now comes the most interesting points: how do people explain their position?

The enthusiasts are distinguished by their commitment to medical research and legal justice. They say: I would contribute “to advancing humanity’s understanding of the human body and genome”. Or: “If it shows the DNA differences to rightly convict someone, I would be willing to donate my DNA. At least 11% of enthusiasts use the word “help” in their comments.

Hopes also want to foster research, which is a little confusing because they’re much more skeptical of the impact of genomics on human phenotypes. But their hallmark is technological optimism, more or less whatever science it derives from: “Any research that can help us better understand ourselves, where we came from and how it affects [sic] all of us is important. If all it takes is a levy from me to support this effort, then I’m ready. They are also curious: “Para enterarme de una experiencia nueva”.

Not only are skeptics less willing to contribute, but their tone differs as well. Many are, that’s when I started, angry, “Snoop. to spy. to spy. It’s bad enough that companies keep track of my purchase information just so I can save a dime on a bar of soap. Or, “None Of Any Bodies Business”, or, “I think the government has way too much freedom as it is. We (the people) are not slaves or their property. It should be illegal for them to d have so much control over people.

Here’s another conundrum: This last answer, which is common, concerns medical biobanks, which have no clear link to the government and have been explained in terms of “scientists”, “disease” and “organizations”. But a quarter of skeptics point to the government to explain its reluctance to contribute to a scientific biobank. Their hostility to “Big Brother” is even more significant in the legal realm: “I just don’t trust the government and law enforcement in these cases. I admit, paranoidly, seeing a Hitler and medical experimentation and future control of who lives or dies based on that sort of thing. After all, “those who speak often are framed or disappear altogether.”

Again, there are left and right versions of this view.

Finally, if the Skeptics are enraged at their helplessness and vulnerability, the Modal Rejector simply withdraws from societal involvement as well as the invitation to engage with the survey. The picture that emerges is that skeptics see a lot of danger in the use of genomic science and are motivated to fight it. In contrast, the Rejecters dismiss the whole enterprise as a waste of time and effort in which they have no interest. They speak little of privacy or mistrust; their hallmark is a global, laconic, indeterminate refusal to communicate.

Typical comments are “not interested”. “I do not care.” “Por que no megustaria hacer eso.” “No.” “Nothing.” “I won’t.” Rejectors can reject society and interpersonal exchanges, as well as technology and genomics.

Anger can have many manifestations: political mobilization, withdrawal, withdrawal. Even in the relatively unpoliticized and unknown field of genomic science, it manifests itself in distinct ways. Analyzing who enthusiastically contributes to research or wants to help, who sees Hitler around the corner, who completely disengages and why could give us clues on how to undo the sorry state of politics and society. Americans in which we now live.


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Genome science: skeptics are angry and rejecters retreat https://dagulfsghost.com/genome-science-skeptics-are-angry-and-rejecters-retreat-2/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/genome-science-skeptics-are-angry-and-rejecters-retreat-2/ It’s no secret that a tiny but perhaps growing portion of Americans are deeply angry with many, if not all, societal and political institutions. On the right, reasons for the furor include fear of racial or gender replacement, belief that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, anxiety about the chances of economic improvement, and fear […]]]>

It’s no secret that a tiny but perhaps growing portion of Americans are deeply angry with many, if not all, societal and political institutions. On the right, reasons for the furor include fear of racial or gender replacement, belief that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, anxiety about the chances of economic improvement, and fear that the international domination of the America is moving away.

On the left, reasons for the fury include the perception that white or male supremacy is overwhelming and unchangeable, that the state is repressive and violent rather than liberal or democratic, and that people only care about themselves and nothing from others.

Leftists talk about fascism and Nazism. Right-wingers talk about communism and socialism; there seems to be nothing new under the sun, at least in terms of American opprobrium.

My contribution to this anguished non-dialogue is to extend it to something genuinely new – the ways in which Americans explain their views on the use of genomic science in society.

A previous article on Our Complicated Views pointed out that Americans’ views on the societal use of genomics are poorly explained by partisanship or ideology, race or gender, education or scientific knowledge, religion or religiosity, or other characteristics that social scientists use to explain variation in attitudes.

Instead, views fall into four mostly psychological categories: Enthusiasts see genomic science as important in explaining human behavior and full of promise; Hopefuls consider genetics not very important but nevertheless see the benefits of science; Skeptics see genetics as important but worry about its risks; and rejecters do not view genetics as important and do not anticipate the benefits of science.

Organizing views across this typology emerged from two large representative online surveys of American adults in 2011 and 2018. In these, I asked parallel sets of questions about views on medical biobanks and forensic DNA databases (without using these terms). After respondents read a brief explanation and answered some attitude questions about medical biobanks, the survey asked them if they would be willing to contribute a DNA sample to one. Respondents then saw a text box asking why they would be ready [or unwilling, depending on the prior response] to contribute. The same procedure is followed for forensic DNA databases.

I expected a few hundred comments that I could analyze for an article and sprinkle the book with illuminating vignettes. Instead, across the two surveys and the two questions, I received nearly 10,000 responses. Some were uncodable or irrelevant, but over several years a small army of research assistants and I coded almost 8,000 of them according to several schemes. A coding scheme says a lot about the anger of Americans.

Going through the details, about three-fifths of Americans are enthusiasts, with more than two-thirds of whom would contribute to medical or forensic DNA databases, or both. More than a quarter of Americans are optimists, of which about three-fifths would contribute. About 6% are skeptics and 6% are rejecters; nearly a third of Skeptics and about a quarter of Rejectors would contribute.

In short, many more Americans are enthusiastic about the benefits of genomics science, or at least hopeful, than skeptical about using or rejecting genomics from the whole scientific enterprise. The most enthusiastic are the most willing to contribute, while the strongest opponents are the least willing; not a surprise, but reassuring about the validity of my categories (which were taken from totally separate indices). Now comes the most interesting points: how do people explain their position?

The enthusiasts are distinguished by their commitment to medical research and legal justice. They say: I would contribute “to advancing humanity’s understanding of the human body and genome”. Or: “If it shows the DNA differences to rightly convict someone, I would be willing to donate my DNA. At least 11% of enthusiasts use the word “help” in their comments.

Hopes also want to foster research, which is a little confusing because they’re much more skeptical of the impact of genomics on human phenotypes. But their hallmark is technological optimism, more or less whatever science it derives from: “Any research that can help us better understand ourselves, where we came from and how it affects [sic] all of us is important. If all it takes is a levy from me to support this effort, then I’m ready. They are also curious: “Para enterarme de una experiencia nueva”.

Not only are skeptics less willing to contribute, but their tone differs as well. Many are, that’s when I started, angry, “Snoop. to spy. to spy. It’s bad enough that companies keep track of my purchase information just so I can save a dime on a bar of soap. Or, “None Of Any Bodies Business”, or, “I think the government has way too much freedom as it is. We (the people) are not slaves or their property. It should be illegal for them to d have so much control over people.

Here’s another conundrum: This last answer, which is common, concerns medical biobanks, which have no clear link to the government and have been explained in terms of “scientists”, “disease” and “organizations”. But a quarter of skeptics point to the government to explain its reluctance to contribute to a scientific biobank. Their hostility to “Big Brother” is even more significant in the legal realm: “I just don’t trust the government and law enforcement in these cases. I admit, paranoidly, seeing a Hitler and medical experimentation and future control of who lives or dies based on that sort of thing. After all, “those who speak often are framed or disappear altogether.”

Again, there are left and right versions of this view.

Finally, if the Skeptics are enraged at their helplessness and vulnerability, the Modal Rejector simply withdraws from societal involvement as well as the invitation to engage with the survey. The picture that emerges is that skeptics see a lot of danger in the use of genomic science and are motivated to fight it. In contrast, the Rejecters dismiss the whole enterprise as a waste of time and effort in which they have no interest. They speak little of privacy or mistrust; their hallmark is a global, laconic, indeterminate refusal to communicate.

Typical comments are “not interested”. “I do not care.” “Por que no megustaria hacer eso.” “No.” “Nothing.” “I’m not going to.” Rejectors can reject society and interpersonal exchanges, as well as technology and genomics.

Anger can have many manifestations: political mobilization, withdrawal, withdrawal. Even in the relatively unpoliticized and unknown field of genomic science, it manifests itself in distinct ways. Analyzing who enthusiastically contributes to research or wants to help, who sees Hitler around the corner, who completely disengages and why could give us clues on how to undo the sorry state of politics and society. Americans in which we now live.


Source link

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Your guide to being a good friend https://dagulfsghost.com/your-guide-to-being-a-good-friend/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/your-guide-to-being-a-good-friend/ Source: Omar Lopez/Unsplash We spend a lot of time analyzing and investing in our romantic relationships, and couples counseling continues to grow in popularity. Likewise, we make sure our professionals work, because let’s face it, they’re pretty important to our careers. But what about the relationships that are among the most fulfilling for our souls? […]]]>

Source: Omar Lopez/Unsplash

We spend a lot of time analyzing and investing in our romantic relationships, and couples counseling continues to grow in popularity. Likewise, we make sure our professionals work, because let’s face it, they’re pretty important to our careers. But what about the relationships that are among the most fulfilling for our souls? And our friendships?

A friendship is often described as Platonic– even if that word really doesn’t do it justice. Of course, we have different levels of intensity in our friendships, but the ones that mean the most to us surely deserve some attention. When was the last time you asked yourself, “Am I a good friend?” »

Sometimes this question isn’t necessary because everything seems to flow naturally and seamlessly. Maybe you live in the same neighborhood and bump into each other every day. Maybe you work with your best friends and have a great day at work every day because of it. Maybe you’ve been seeing each other a lot lately, as you’ve helped each other through similar challenges.

Other times it might be a good idea to check with this question. Not because you think you’ve been a bad friend, but because you want to make sure your friends know you’re there for them. Maybe you live hundreds or thousands of miles away and forgot to pick up the phone to maintain that touching connection. Maybe you just got a little overwhelmed with the hustle and bustle of life, and every quiet moment you had, you wanted to spend alone. Whatever situation you find yourself in is OK. That’s life; it goes up and down, and left and right.

Still, it’s good to remember what makes you a good friend to remind them that you care about them, even if you’ve been a little quiet lately. Here’s how:

1. Take the time to connect with your friends.

Not via Instagram or email, but real face-to-face interactions (or video calls if they’re far away). We all live busy lives, but if you want to keep your friendships alive, you need to invest time and energy into it. You know that whatever you invest, you will get hundreds back.

2. Share intimate thoughts and feelings with them.

Being transparent and real is what makes your friendships so special. You love how your friends share their deepest secrets and biggest dreams with you, and they love that you do the same. It’s what brings you together and creates bonds for life.

3. Be a good listener.

Sometimes your friends just need someone to listen to what they have to say. Maybe they just need to let off steam to clear the negativity from their system, or maybe they need to speak out loud to overcome a challenge they have. Don’t rush with too much advice unless they ask you. First of all, listen to them and be there for them.

4. Express your admiration and appreciation for them.

Be there for their successes as much as you are there for their setbacks. Celebrate their accomplishments with them and tell them how proud you are of them. Tell them how much it means to you to have them in your life.

5. Hug.

When you see your friends in real life, don’t hesitate to hug them (and the longer the better!). Science is there to show that hugs increase your happiness and your health, but also your connection to others. So hug, hug and hug again!


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Students Should Use Psychology Department Counseling Services – The Rocky Mountain Collegian https://dagulfsghost.com/students-should-use-psychology-department-counseling-services-the-rocky-mountain-collegian/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://dagulfsghost.com/students-should-use-psychology-department-counseling-services-the-rocky-mountain-collegian/ With the mental impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on all of us, more students should take advantage of CSU’s Psychological Services Center. College student | Luc Bourland A sign hangs in Sage Hall on the Colorado State University campus on January 31. Sage Hall is where the Colorado School of Public Health at CSU […]]]>

With the mental impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on all of us, more students should take advantage of CSU’s Psychological Services Center.

College student | Luc Bourland

A sign hangs in Sage Hall on the Colorado State University campus on January 31. Sage Hall is where the Colorado School of Public Health at CSU resides along with the Center for Psychological Services.

Nathaniel McKissick, college columnist

Editor’s note: All content in the opinion section reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a position taken by The Collegian or its editorial board.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had resounding effects on all of us to varying degrees. Some people have experienced the profound loss of a loved one, others have lost their job or their home. It’s hard to quantify how hard this virus has taken us, but one thing is certain: it has affected our mental health as a nation.

That’s according to a Kaiser Family Foundation health tracking survey from 2020, at least. The poll reported an increase in sleep or eating disorders, alcohol use, and self-reported symptoms of depression and/or anxiety after the COVID-19 pandemic gripped the country.

In these tumultuous times, it really is only natural to feel emotionally drained or depressed. We’ve been in a pandemic for nearly two years, and the shockwaves of the virus are still being felt across the country. To alleviate stress, depression or anxiety, counseling can help.

Most Colorado State University Students Are Familiar With The School’s Free Counseling sessions with a CSU Health Network counselor, but $15 an hour therapy from the psychology department sessions for full-time students can fly under the radar.

“PSC provides therapy services and psychological assessments for multiple demographic groups, including children, couples, families, and individual adults.”

The agency affiliated with the Department of Psychology, aptly called Psychological Services Centeris a community mental health agency and is located at 700 S. Mason St. Additionally, the PSC has an office in Room 119 of the Gifford Building.

PSC provides therapy services and psychological assessments for several demographic groups, including children, couples, families, and individual adults.

The center also offers assessment and group therapy services. CSU Health Network Counseling Services offers group therapy, but unfortunately does not offer psychological services. appraisal services due to the “considerable time required for full psychological assessments”.

Wait times at the PSC can fluctuate, as can the waitlist for CSU Health Network counseling services. According to Dr. Michael Brinker, Director of the PSC, the waiting list is estimated at three months at present. Meanwhile, the waiting list for CSU Health Network counseling services is currently one to five days, according to CSU Health Network Associate Director of Communications Kate Hagdorn.

The best time to get on the PSC waiting list is in the fall, which is when Brinker said there were more fresh-faced therapists available before loads of course does not heat up.

“At the start of the fall semester, we have a new group of therapists starting to take on cases, and we’re going through the waitlist pretty quickly at that time,” Brinker said. “Later in the semester, when the student workload is fuller, we are slower to pick up new cases.”

“No matter where you seek counseling services for yourself, however, it’s important to take care of your mental health during these turbulent times.”

Is this the best time to join the waitlist if you are graduating in May? Definitely not, but if you’re looking for counseling during the summer months, PSC may be your best route, as the CSU Health Network Counseling Services staff are more limited in the summer.

Hagdorn reported that only about 18% of CSU’s in-person resident student population is seen for counseling services per year — that’s 5,000 students. Meanwhile, Brinker said the majority of PSC patients are not students.

According to the Counseling Services Section of the CSU Health Network website, “most students see their counselor (CSU Health Network) every two to three weeks for one-on-one appointments.” Research shows this therapy works best when done once a week for three to four months. In keeping with that and not to overwhelm the CSU Health Network advisors, maybe it’s time to give another vendor a shot.

No matter where you seek counseling services for yourself, however, it’s important to take care of your mental health in these turbulent times. The last thing we want to do is let COVID-19 win.

Contact Nathaniel McKissick at letters@collegian.com or on Twitter @NateMcKissick.



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